Economic Development – Avance Economico http://avanceeconomico.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 05:56:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://avanceeconomico.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-7.png Economic Development – Avance Economico http://avanceeconomico.com/ 32 32 DDOT rider, defender: service cuts send economic mobility “in the wrong direction” http://avanceeconomico.com/ddot-rider-defender-service-cuts-send-economic-mobility-in-the-wrong-direction/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 04:04:00 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/ddot-rider-defender-service-cuts-send-economic-mobility-in-the-wrong-direction/ The Detroit Department of Transportation is a highly visible but easily overlooked aspect of life in the city of Detroit. In Motor City, the public bus has the ability to reliably connect Detroiters to employment opportunities, provide reliable access to educational institutions, provide transportation to health services, and populate the sidewalks of Detroit with more […]]]>

The Detroit Department of Transportation is a highly visible but easily overlooked aspect of life in the city of Detroit.

In Motor City, the public bus has the ability to reliably connect Detroiters to employment opportunities, provide reliable access to educational institutions, provide transportation to health services, and populate the sidewalks of Detroit with more pedestrians and potential buyers.

In a time of economic uncertainty and disruption for many independent retailers in Detroit, improving our transit infrastructure and services must be part of all future economic development strategies.

Over the past four years, Public Streetscape Projects in the City of Detroit have done a great job of widening sidewalks and making roads more welcoming to pedestrians, cyclists and people with walking disabilities. .

However, when one takes a closer look at the completed streetscapes on roads like Grand River, Livernois, Kercheval, and West McNichols, foot traffic is greatest near important connection points for buses, where adults and the schoolchildren change their route and wait to complete their trip.

While waiting for their bus, riders often run inside a store for a snack or a drink, fast enough not to miss the next bus.

Unlike motorists, these pedestrians and bus riders are a captive audience for the retail businesses in front of them.

As motorists drive past retail spaces with a destination in mind, transit riders, cyclists and pedestrians have the opportunity to visually explore their surroundings and immediately use the products and services marketed in front of them. them.

More frequent and faster bus rides will allow new and existing riders to spend more time navigating Detroit’s various corridors and spending money.

The importance of public transport for economic activity is confirmed by national data. According to the American Public Transportation Association, for every dollar spent on public transportation, total economic output earns $ 2.90 and $ 1.80 in GDP.

In addition to the commercial activity that pedestrians, bus riders and cyclists provide to neighborhood brick and mortar retailers, they also serve as a public safety tool.

The increased activity on sidewalks and the side of the road is a natural deterrent for people seeking to cause property damage or personal injury. Assuming that most criminal activity is committed by a relatively small percentage of people and with the intention of not being seen, an increase in bus ridership would help Detroit residents, through the physical presence of riders on sidewalks. , to make criminal activity less attractive. There is strength in numbers.

At the same time, as the streets and sidewalks of Detroit become less welcoming to dangerous and criminal behavior, they become more welcoming to positive and productive community activities.

According to data from the 2019 American Community Survey, 22% of registered households in Detroit have no vehicles available.

So while 68.4 percent of Detroit residents drive to work on their own, nearly 30 percent of Detroit residents carpool, walk, cycle, taxi, or use public transportation.

About 7.5% of Detroit residents use public transportation to get to work. Imagine the economic and public safety benefits of that percentage reaching 20 percent.

To give an idea of ​​the use of public transportation, Portland and Las Vegas are two cities with 600,000 to 700,000 residents and 100 to 200 square miles of land, like Detroit.

Las Vegas has only 2.46% of residents who use public transportation to get to work, while Portland has 13.4%. Detroit has almost twice as many employed residents without a vehicle as Las Vegas.

However, the reluctance of many Detroiters to take the bus is justified. Over the past year, the rate of DDOT evening buses showing up for their route (pickup rate), on time or late, has increased from 96.9% to 57%.

For people to leave work and show up at their bus stop on time, but the bus never showing up, is more than unacceptable.

DDOT began September with an announcement of service cuts that will create longer gaps between bus arrivals on many routes while suspending service to others.

The reduced frequency will not encourage more Detroiters to use the bus for their transportation needs; instead, they will drive, with or without valid auto insurance or license.

Others will be less likely to venture outside their neighborhood to take advantage of important economic or health opportunities. It is a trend in the wrong direction.

As Detroit struggles to retain existing residents while attracting new ones, the provision of world-class public services will be essential to its social, economic and political well-being.

Along with attractive public schools, parks and recreation centers, and library branches, excellent public transportation will make Detroit a more vibrant city to work, play and live.

The provision of frequent, fast, reliable and fair public transport is an effective component of our city’s economic rebound.

Let’s get more Detroiters and their city’s economy back in motion with improved public bus service.


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Nathan Reuss hired as an economic developer for the Mid-Minnesota Development Commission http://avanceeconomico.com/nathan-reuss-hired-as-an-economic-developer-for-the-mid-minnesota-development-commission/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 17:00:00 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/nathan-reuss-hired-as-an-economic-developer-for-the-mid-minnesota-development-commission/ Reuss joined Michelle Marotzke in the MMDC economic development team in mid-September. Together, Marotzke and Reuss will help stakeholders across the region of Kandiyohi County, McLeod, Meeker and Renville, as they recover from the economic wounds caused by the pandemic. Reuss will also help stakeholders with grant applications, tackle issues such as broadband, childcare, housing […]]]>

Reuss joined Michelle Marotzke in the MMDC economic development team in mid-September.

Together, Marotzke and Reuss will help stakeholders across the region of Kandiyohi County, McLeod, Meeker and Renville, as they recover from the economic wounds caused by the pandemic.

Reuss will also help stakeholders with grant applications, tackle issues such as broadband, childcare, housing and labor shortages, and help develop a comprehensive strategy for the economic development of the region.

“I couldn’t be more excited to join the dynamic and talented staff of professionals at MMDC. I have had the opportunity to live and work in each of the four counties in the MMDC region and hope to be useful in the role of economic developer. Reuss said in the statement.

Reuss is a native of WIllmar and a graduate of the University of Minnesota – Morris. He has worked in the agriculture, biotechnology and public safety sectors. His professional experience includes seed research for Hi-Bred, Dow AgriSciences and Corteva Agriscience. Reuss was also a volunteer firefighter.

Together, Reuss and his two children, Eric and Rylie, enjoy spending time on the family farm and enjoying the attributes of his home region.


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Regular meeting of the board of directors of the Bonham Economic Development Corporation on September 20 http://avanceeconomico.com/regular-meeting-of-the-board-of-directors-of-the-bonham-economic-development-corporation-on-september-20/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 01:52:49 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/regular-meeting-of-the-board-of-directors-of-the-bonham-economic-development-corporation-on-september-20/ Board of Directors of theBonham Economic Development Corporation~ Regular meeting ~Date and time: Monday, September 20, 2021, 5:30 p.m.Location: Bonham Town Hall, 514 Chestnut St. AGENDA Invocation 1. A. Call to order B. Welcome to the new member of the board of directors 2. A. Consider and take action to approve August 16, 2021,Bonham Economic […]]]>

Board of Directors of the
Bonham Economic Development Corporation
~ Regular meeting ~
Date and time: Monday, September 20, 2021, 5:30 p.m.
Location: Bonham Town Hall, 514 Chestnut St.

AGENDA

Invocation

1. A. Call to order

B. Welcome to the new member of the board of directors

2. A. Consider and take action to approve August 16, 2021,
Bonham Economic Development Regular Meeting Minutes
Board of Directors of the Corporation (BEDCO).

B. Review meeting of the Agenda Item Review Committee of September 16 (AIRC)

3. Opportunity for citizens to speak: [The Board of Directors of the Bonham
Economic Development Corporation invites persons with comments or
observations to briefly address the Board for the limited purpose of
determining whether the matter should be referred to staff for study and
response and/or be placed on a future meeting agenda. Local practice limits comments to three (3) minutes or less. State law prohibits the Board of Directors from considering deliberations on any item not listed on the
posted Board of Directors Agenda.]

4. Hold a public hearing on the measure considered by the council to adopt a
Resolution designating the Reddy Event Center as “a project”.

5. A. Consider possible action to accept financial reports for
July and August 2021

B. Future financial commitments of BEDCo ~ when available

6. Discussion and possible action to ratify the commitment of up to
$ 5,000 funds for BEDCo promotional activities to partially cover costs
associated with the Bonham Festival of Flight 2021, by the Executive
Director – Economic Development

7. Discussion and possible action to adopt the BEDCo FY 2021-2022
(FY’22) Operating budget, subject to ratification by Bonham City
advice

8. Downtown Bonham – Texas Downtown Association (TDA) Assessment –
Update

9. Update from the Executive Director: Topics include, but are not limited to
to: BEDC attendance at annual TEDC conference, planned ED sales tax training, recap of Bonham Mfgs # 15 (virtual) roundtable, ongoing dialogue on Jones Field airport improvements, and other projects / perspectives of interest, etc. (planned as verbal update – delivery possible at board meeting)

10. Adjournment


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Minnesota Involves Labor and Nonprofit Organizations in Economic Development Council – Dakota Free Press http://avanceeconomico.com/minnesota-involves-labor-and-nonprofit-organizations-in-economic-development-council-dakota-free-press/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:14:34 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/minnesota-involves-labor-and-nonprofit-organizations-in-economic-development-council-dakota-free-press/ I’m giving the South Dakota government a hard time for its close business-über-alles mentality. Our short-sighted willingness to do anything for money leads to CAFO air and water pollution, super-spreader rallies in the midst of a pandemic, undercompensation for workers and underinvestment in public goods. Of course, each state seeks to be of service to […]]]>

I’m giving the South Dakota government a hard time for its close business-über-alles mentality. Our short-sighted willingness to do anything for money leads to CAFO air and water pollution, super-spreader rallies in the midst of a pandemic, undercompensation for workers and underinvestment in public goods.

Of course, each state seeks to be of service to large corporations. Even our socialist neighbors east in Minnesota are encouraging businesses to build and expand in the Twin Cities and around these 10,000 lakes. Minnesota just manages to do better, hosting eighteen Fortune 500 companies (compared to zero in South Dakota) and taxing their colossal income to build more roads and libraries and pay their teachers significantly better salaries.

And even when Minnesota creates a new committee to work on economic development, they don’t just pick a bunch of corporate buddies to figure out how to plunder the treasure and concentrate the wealth among their one percent friends. They include worker and social justice advocates to focus on share the wealth with all Minnesotans:

Governor Tim Walz called on 15 business and nonprofit leaders to form a Economic expansion council to address Minnesota’s labor shortage and ensure the state’s economic recovery is fair.

… The board will be co-chaired by Paul Williams, CEO of Project for Pride in Living in Minneapolis, and Jeff Ettinger, former CEO of Hormel Foods Inc. in Austin.

The other members, who will serve a one-year term, include Neel Kashkari, chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, Bharti Wahi, executive director of the Children’s Defense Fund-Minnesota, and Penny Wheeler, CEO of Allina Health. It also includes leaders from labor and industry groups such as SEIU Healthcare Minnesota.

Williams noted that the pandemic has been particularly harsh on people and communities of color.

“We see that day in and day out low income people are really struggling to make ends meet even in the midst of a strong economic recovery,” he said. [Kavita Lumar, “As Minnesota’s Economic Recovery Zig-Zags, Walz Taps a Council to Drive Growth,” Minneapolis Star Tribune, 2021.09.14].

Imagine the conversations we could have about economic development if, among all the bankers and realtors and other lawsuits, South Dakota Economic Development Council included the CEO of Feeding South Dakota and the president of South Dakota Voices for Peace. Imagine if the next governor chose as the next one Head of Economic Development not another buddy-capitalist pocket lining but one of the Sisters of the Presentation, or perhaps the president of the South Dakota Federation of Labor.

Economic development should be more than favors for big capitalists and the fantasy that runoff is something other than pissing on it. Economic development should look at the economy as a whole, and our economic development committees should represent all interests.


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Eight Ideas to Boost New York’s Economic Recovery Now http://avanceeconomico.com/eight-ideas-to-boost-new-yorks-economic-recovery-now/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 00:36:06 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/eight-ideas-to-boost-new-yorks-economic-recovery-now/ Ribbon cutting and more to come (Photo: Ed Reed / Mayoral Photography Office) It would be foolish to bet against New York, but a full and robust return from the COVID-19 crisis is not guaranteed without bold action. It is increasingly clear that the city’s recovery is not like the others. Businesses are delaying return-to-work […]]]>

Ribbon cutting and more to come (Photo: Ed Reed / Mayoral Photography Office)


It would be foolish to bet against New York, but a full and robust return from the COVID-19 crisis is not guaranteed without bold action. It is increasingly clear that the city’s recovery is not like the others. Businesses are delaying return-to-work plans, the 10.2% unemployment rate is among the highest of any major city in the country, and unemployment rates among New Yorkers of color and young adults are particularly high. alarming.

Meanwhile, no other city faces so many structural economic challenges brought on by the pandemic. The rise of remote working and the slow recovery in tourism, the continued disruption of retail and the severe blow to the arts are disproportionately threatening vital parts of New York’s economy.

Putting New York on the path to a sustainable and equitable recovery will require not only bold actions, but also new, innovative and creative solutions. Fortunately, the massive turnaround in municipal government that took place in less than four months, along with the new leadership in Albany, offers an incredible opportunity to take critical steps towards recovery. We have already seen many primary election winners come up with great new ideas for building a stronger and fairer city.

The Center for an Urban Future recently released a Plan for a Fair Recovery that presents concrete policy ideas from a diverse mix of 175 committed New Yorkers. Some of the nearly 250 ideas we received would help create jobs now or support New Yorkers hardest hit by the pandemic, while others would lay the groundwork for a stronger, more inclusive economy in long term.

While each idea is worth considering, we believe the following eight warrant swift action from current and future city leaders.

1. Match tech savvy CUNY students with small businesses that need help adopting technology (S. David Wu, President, Baruch College)
Many small businesses are still hanging by a thread and need urgent help to modernize their operations with e-commerce, digital marketing and better financial planning. The city can help them become more competitive in the long run by creating a matchmaking service that pairs businesses with talented and digitally savvy CUNY students who are rooted in communities facing today’s greatest needs.

2. Make NYC a Public Health Capital of the World (Seth Pinsky, CEO, 92nd Street Y)
In the wake of the pandemic, millions of dollars in new public and private investment are about to flow into the public health sector, creating thousands of new, well-paying jobs. It means investing in hospitals and the healthcare system and finally delivering on New York’s promise to become a leading hub in commercial biosciences. And unlike many other sectors of the city’s economy, most of these jobs cannot be easily done remotely.

3. Stimulate the return to the office by supporting public programming that invigorates business districts (Larisa Ortiz, General Manager, Streetsense)
To attract office workers, the city should support new amenities and public programs in these neighborhoods, including new options not found in most residential neighborhoods. For example, New York should take a page from Vancouver, which turned the alleys into brightly painted spaces with basketball courts and foosball tables, and Montreal, which created interactive musical swings.

4. Stimulate economic development in underserved communities by making long-awaited improvements to the public domain (Purnima Kapur, Head of University Planning and Design, Harvard University)
Those responsible for economic development can spur economic investments, the growth of small businesses and the creation of jobs in low-income communities in the five boroughs by making investments in the public domain, such as improving sidewalks, creating new pocket parks and improved lighting. Streetscape improvements like these often serve as catalysts for economic development, but too many hard-hit areas of the city have historically been overlooked by these local place-creation projects.

5. Break the deadlock around housing development in New York with a big deal around housing and employment (Rafael Cestero, President, Community Preservation Corp)
The pandemic has only amplified the need for more affordable housing. It’s time to make a big deal by creating a city-wide structure that eliminates the power of individual groups or local representatives to scuttle projects due to micro-issues, reallocates housing vouchers to create housing very affordable on a large scale in communities that need it most, and requires local hiring on all large projects involving land or city capital.

6. Providing New Income Supports for New York’s Fast-Growing (But Low-Paid) Direct Care Workforce (Jodi M. Sturgeon, President, PHI)
The industry already employs more than 320,000 New Yorkers, and the city’s aging population makes it almost certain that the number of jobs will increase dramatically over the next decade. But the sector also pays some of the lowest wages of any industry. The city should create an innovation fund for home care jobs, providing workers with transportation funds, scholarship programs and retention bonuses, while making new investments in vocational training for direct care workers. in order to improve the quality of their jobs and their economic prospects.

7. Create a NYC Climate Corps (Tonya Gayle, Executive Director, Green City Force)
The city’s teens and young adults were much more likely to lose their jobs during the pandemic than other New Yorkers. The city can help thousands of these young adults get on the right track by mobilizing federal infrastructure funds to create a NYC Climate Corps, which would also crucially help the city prepare for the impacts of climate change.

8. Invest in quality child care for New Yorkers in workforce training programs (Plinio Ayala, President and CEO, Per Scholas)
With 400,000 unemployed New Yorkers and many industries facing a slow recovery, the city should help unemployed New Yorkers learn new skills so they can transition to growing industries. But that will require tackling a barrier that has long prevented many low-income New Yorkers from enrolling in workforce training programs: the lack of affordable child care.

The next mayor and the new leaders of the city administration will need a lot of good ideas over the coming year to ensure that the city’s nascent recovery takes hold and gathers momentum. To build a stronger, more equitable economy for the long term, city leaders must tap into the ingenuity and experience of our fellow New Yorkers who know how to best support the city’s diverse communities and economy. .

***
Jonathan Bowles is the Executive Director of the Center for an Urban Future. Winston Fisher is a partner at Fisher Brothers. On Twitter @jbowlesnyc & @nycfuture & @ Winston_Fisher1.

***
Got an opinion piece or a Gotham Gazette submission? E-mail This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.



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Action on infrastructure is essential to Louisville’s economic growth http://avanceeconomico.com/action-on-infrastructure-is-essential-to-louisvilles-economic-growth/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 13:06:04 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/action-on-infrastructure-is-essential-to-louisvilles-economic-growth/ For most of us, infrastructure is a constant. You assume that you will have access to safe and reliable roads and bridges to take you to work or on vacation. You assume that the water will come out of the faucet when you turn the handle, and you will connect to Wi-Fi as soon as […]]]>

For most of us, infrastructure is a constant. You assume that you will have access to safe and reliable roads and bridges to take you to work or on vacation. You assume that the water will come out of the faucet when you turn the handle, and you will connect to Wi-Fi as soon as you turn on the computer. And while you may notice occasional potholes on the commute to work or backups on the bridge due to repairs, you never stop to think about daily wear and tear and lifespan. of such a critical part of our daily life and our economy?

For too long, the maintenance and improvement of infrastructure in our region has been neglected. We’ve all experienced the minor inconveniences of repaving roads or internet blackouts, but continuing to kick-start major improvements to our infrastructure could have catastrophic impacts on our community and our economy.


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Corpus Christi City Sets Up New Economic Development Office for Small Business Owners http://avanceeconomico.com/corpus-christi-city-sets-up-new-economic-development-office-for-small-business-owners/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 23:00:00 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/corpus-christi-city-sets-up-new-economic-development-office-for-small-business-owners/ Although we have a Regional Economic Development Corporation that works to bring large industries to the city, the needs of small businesses are not taken into account. CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – Corpus Christi City Manager Peter Zanoni said he is setting up an economic development office at City Hall so small business owners finally have […]]]>

Although we have a Regional Economic Development Corporation that works to bring large industries to the city, the needs of small businesses are not taken into account.

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – Corpus Christi City Manager Peter Zanoni said he is setting up an economic development office at City Hall so small business owners finally have a place to turn to. get answers and help.

This is something Zanoni has said he has wanted to do for a long time, and he hopes it will help let the state know that Corpus Christi is small business friendly.

“At the moment, I don’t know who you are calling,” Zanoni said. “I don’t even know who to call if we have an economic development issue in the city. We should know by now.”

Zanoni said there would finally be a contact person to handle these calls for help from small business owners. Although we have a regional economic development company that is working to bring large industries to the city, Zanoni said there is still a huge gap where the needs of small business owners are not being fully addressed by anyone. His plans are to create a five-person economic development office to be headed by new Deputy City Manager Andrea Gardner.

“It’s just a lot of the groundwork, getting the word out, like you said, creating a new website, making yourself accessible to businesses as well as the regional EDC, and just working together,” Gardner said.

Former city councilor David Loeb runs his family’s business development company, and he has some ideas for the city manager as the new economic development office is being installed at city hall.

“I think small business retention and recruitment was one of the things, along with infill development to help improve existing neighborhoods,” Loeb said.

Zanoni strongly agreed with this assessment of what needs to be done.

“We will currently focus on recruiting and retaining small businesses and helping them grow as a small business to support as well,” Zanoni said.

The new economic development office will not only try to help small business owners navigate the city’s rules and fees, but it will also offer them incentives to open or grow businesses along hallways like Staples Street. and the city center.

More than 3News on KIIITV.com:


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CT will take longer to recover from COVID recession http://avanceeconomico.com/ct-will-take-longer-to-recover-from-covid-recession/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 21:46:35 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/ct-will-take-longer-to-recover-from-covid-recession/ Unidad Latina en Acción CT A rally titled “Recovery for All” is held in front of the governor’s residence in March 2021. The COVID recession has hit Connecticut’s economy harder than much of the rest of the United States, and the state will take longer to recover, according to a new report from political think […]]]>

Unidad Latina en Acción CT

A rally titled “Recovery for All” is held in front of the governor’s residence in March 2021.

The COVID recession has hit Connecticut’s economy harder than much of the rest of the United States, and the state will take longer to recover, according to a new report from political think tank Connecticut Voices for Children.

The group’s annual meeting Connecticut State of Work Report found that since the Great Recession, Connecticut’s economic output has lagged nearly every other state, and the COVID recession has continued that trend. Connecticut’s economic output contracted 4.1% in 2020, compared to a national decline of 3.5%.

Connecticut has never fully restored the jobs lost in the past three recessions, and in 2020 the state once again experienced larger job losses compared to the United States as a whole, according to the report. The number of non-farm jobs fell 14.7% nationally between February and April 2020; in Connecticut, they fell 17.2%.

“Like the three previous recoveries, the recovery from the recent recession is likely to lag significantly behind the pace of the United States as a whole,” study author Patrick O’Brien said on a call. with reporters on Monday. “The United States is on track to close its current job gap in about 9 months, while Connecticut is on track to fill its current job gap in about 23 months,” he said.

The impact of inequalities

This is in part due to the state’s great economic inequalities. For several decades, real wages have been rising faster for those who already earn the most. And that’s more true for Connecticut than most other states.

Last year, the richest 10% of wage earners in that state earned 5 times more per hour than the bottom 10%, more than the national figure of 4.8. Connecticut also has larger pay differentials by race and ethnicity and gender than the United States as a whole, according to the report.

This “highly inequitable distribution” hurts low- and middle-income families, O’Brien said, and it can hamper economic growth.

“There is a definite relationship between these two components – this idea of ​​the size of the Connecticut economy and the distribution within it,” added O’Brien. “In the simplest sense, if you give money to a working class family, they will spend a much larger percentage of that money going directly into the economy.” Wealthy families, on the other hand, might be more likely to save money or spend it out of state, he said.

Solutions

The report ends with a handful of progressive policy recommendations, including tax reform that would shift the “tax burden from working and middle class families to the rich” and spending reform that would shift “spending to programs that benefit more. directly to workers ”. middle class families. An overall increase in taxes and spending would boost economic growth even more, the report said.

“A lot of the things they are talking about are incorporated into our current budget document,” said Senator Cathy Osten, D-Sprague. This includes the working income tax credit, the increase in the minimum wage, and additional support for things like group homes and food banks, she said.

“Can we do more? Yes, ”said Osten. “But are we tackling a lot of the issues they call? Absoutely.”

Chris DiPentima, president of the Connecticut Business & Industry Association, said he was wary of tax reform after two major tax hikes in 2011 and 2015. “We have tried this experiment in a way before,” he said. -he declares. “It actually did the opposite, it just dragged down the economy.”

DiPentima said according to a recent survey of members of his organization, “affordability” is a major concern for businesses and residents of Connecticut. The idea of ​​increasing taxes or government spending is anathema to solving this affordability problem, he said. “To redefine the priorities on which we spend money, that obviously should be the goal,” he said.

DiPentima said he agreed with the report’s finding that inequality – particularly the way it plays out in education and workforce development – is holding back Connecticut. “You can have businesses here, but if you don’t have the workers here, you’re not going to realize your true potential. “

For his part, Osten also highlighted recent efforts to expand adult education, certificate programs and other workforce developments. “These are the things that are going to shake things up on both jobs, the incoming income and the ability for us to solve the problems of those who need it most,” she said.


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GFDA welcomes public participation in meeting on local economy http://avanceeconomico.com/gfda-welcomes-public-participation-in-meeting-on-local-economy/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 14:43:00 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/gfda-welcomes-public-participation-in-meeting-on-local-economy/ The Great Falls Development Authority (GFDA) is hosting a strategic planning community meeting on Wednesday and invites the public not only to attend, but to participate. GFDA is keen to hear from community members to gather information on strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the local economy as the department begins the process of creating […]]]>

The Great Falls Development Authority (GFDA) is hosting a strategic planning community meeting on Wednesday and invites the public not only to attend, but to participate.

GFDA is keen to hear from community members to gather information on strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the local economy as the department begins the process of creating a regional economic development strategy.

“Next Wednesday night, it won’t be a presentation, it will be: listen,” said Brett Doney, president and CEO of GFDA.

The Event will be at the Great Falls College MSU campus in room B101, take the south entrance and use gate seven, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.


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NH Delegation Announces $ 60 Million Investment in Mascoma Bank to Support Small Business and Community Development http://avanceeconomico.com/nh-delegation-announces-60-million-investment-in-mascoma-bank-to-support-small-business-and-community-development/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 20:52:15 +0000 http://avanceeconomico.com/nh-delegation-announces-60-million-investment-in-mascoma-bank-to-support-small-business-and-community-development/ September 08, 2021 (Manchester, NH) – Today, US Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), a senior member of the Senate Small Business and Credit Committees, Senator Maggie Hassan (D-NH) and Representatives Annie Kuster (NH-02) and Chris Pappas (NH-01) announced that Mascoma Bank in Lebanon will receive $ 60 million under the New Markets Tax Credit program ( […]]]>

September 08, 2021

(Manchester, NH) – Today, US Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), a senior member of the Senate Small Business and Credit Committees, Senator Maggie Hassan (D-NH) and Representatives Annie Kuster (NH-02) and Chris Pappas (NH-01) announced that Mascoma Bank in Lebanon will receive $ 60 million under the New Markets Tax Credit program ( NMTC) to promote immediate recovery efforts and sustained economic development. Mascoma Community Development works to help raise capital, facilitate loans, and support community development throughout New Hampshire; this NMTC award will significantly strengthen their ability to invest in our communities.

The NMTC award was announced by the Department of the Treasury’s Community Development Finance Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which promotes development in underserved urban and rural areas by investing in community financial institutions. Senators Shaheen and Hassan are strong supporters of the CDFI Fund and the NMTC program, and Senator Shaheen has advocated for increased funding as a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

“The financial fallout from the pandemic has exacerbated economic devastation in underserved areas of New Hampshire and across the country. This is why targeted funding from institutions like Mascoma Bank is so essential to reverse these trends and boost local economies. By directing money to institutions that invest in small businesses and hard-hit communities, this funding helps create jobs and spur economic growth, ” said Senator Shaheen. “I applaud Mascoma for this important work, and I will continue to work in the Senate to secure much-needed investments for Granite State businesses and communities – especially as we recover from the COVID-19 crisis. “

“These federal dollars will help expand economic opportunities in rural and low-income communities, including investing in small businesses. said Senator Hassan. “I look forward to seeing how this funding will contribute to New Hampshire’s high quality of life in the years to come.

“Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, limited access to financial services and resources in our rural communities hampered growth – as we work to rebuild better after the pandemic, we have a unique opportunity to invest in our rural economies and enhance economic development, ” said Representative Kuster. “This targeted federal funding for Mascoma Bank will support this effort and help foster resilient and vibrant communities as we recover and rebuild.”

“It is essential that we continue to support the development of our rural communities. said representative Pappas. “With this tax credit, Mascoma Bank will be able to support new small businesses and spur development across New Hampshire, assistance that is critically important as we rebuild our local economies after the pandemic. . I remain committed to supporting programs like this to ensure our rural communities have the tools and resources they need to thrive.

“Mascoma Community Development and its parent company, Mascoma Bank, are honored and delighted to have received a New Market Tax Credit allowance in this latest round of awards. We look forward to deploying these funds to help create jobs in underserved communities in New Hampshire, ” said Clayton Adams, President and CEO of Mascoma Bank.

Tax credit allocations to community development entities (CDEs), such as Mascoma Community Development, allow CDEs to offer tax credits to investors in qualifying community development projects. The total tax credit is equivalent to 39% of the initial investment and is spread over a period of seven years, and can be combined and leveraged with other public and private investments to improve the overall impact.



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